Pause

Sit.

Relax.

Be still.

Let the day wait.

Now is the time to listen with intention to God.

What do you hear?

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Listen

On the third day there was a wedding in Cana of Galilee. Jesus’ mother was there, and Jesus and his disciples were also invited to the celebration. When the wine ran out, Jesus’ mother said to him, “They don’t have any wine.”

Jesus replied, “Woman, what does that have to do with me? My time hasn’t come yet.”

His mother told the servants, “Do whatever he tells you.” Nearby were six stone water jars used for the Jewish cleansing ritual, each able to hold about twenty or thirty gallons.

Jesus said to the servants, “Fill the jars with water,” and they filled them to the brim. Then he told them, “Now draw some from them and take it to the headwaiter,” and they did.The headwaiter tasted the water that had become wine. He didn’t know where it came from, though the servants who had drawn the water knew.

John 2:1-9a

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Think

“Fill the jars with water.” How many times am I empty? There are too many things to do. Chores have to be done. Assignments need to be completed. Maybe the sun is shining, but how can I take the time to enjoy it? The “wine” of my spirit has run out.

I remember my first semester of college was a little like that. I chose summer classes with heavy workloads. There were weekly papers and hundreds of math problems. I did not have time to do anything else. My family had a pool. I wanted to swim, but all I had time for was studying with my feet in the water. The water was inviting and refreshing and right there, just out of my reach.

I cannot say that it’s much different today. I allow myself to become spiritually dry. I need to spend time in prayer and silence, but I do not always take the time to receive those gifts. Jesus says, “Fill the jars with water.”

Deborah Guy

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Pray

Right now, Lord, I receive the gift of time spent with you. I sit in the quiet, in your presence. Fill me up. Quench my thirst. Amen.

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Go

Go into the world being the distribution point of all the gifts God has given you, so that the world may know God’s glory and believe.

Deborah Hurd Guy

Deborah Guy lives in Georgia with her cat Midnight. She is an Episcopalian and a writer. Her current book project combines research into the academic literature on poverty and the experiences of the poor in hopes of stripping away the middle class overlay of values and experiences that may blind those who want to help to the practical ways those living in poverty may actually want and need to be helped.

Wondrous Love: O Love That Wilt Not Let Me Go

Mark Hayes

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