Pause

Life’s pathways are not always clearly marked. Trails wind into the wilderness and disappear, leaving no end in sight. And often you may wonder which way to go.

As you journey through life, there is One you can trust to be your guide—the One who has already walked the path for you and who walks beside you even now.

In these quiet moments, be still and listen for the One who is calling you home.

next >

Listen

In you, O Lord, I seek refuge; do not let me ever be put to shame; in your righteousness deliver me. Incline your ear to me; rescue me speedily. Be a rock of refuge for me, a strong fortress to save me.

You are indeed my rock and my fortress; for your name’s sake lead me and guide me, take me out of the net that is hidden for me, for you are my refuge.

Into your hand I commit my spirit; you have redeemed me, O Lord, faithful God.

Psalm 31:1–5

next >

Think

“Mountains don’t care!” I once saw a sign with these words on a hike in Colorado. The message was clear. Hiking in the mountains is dangerous and possibly life-threatening, so be smart and avoid unnecessary risks.

On the journey of life, we inevitably encounter danger. Someone may try to harm us, or we may just find ourselves in the wrong place at the wrong time. We may lose that which we hold dear. Sometimes we face resistance simply for trying to do what we think is right. Whether it comes as an accident or with malicious intent, it will happen. Perhaps it has already.

When we find ourselves in the midst of the squall, we have somewhere to turn. Wounded, scared, alone—God is our shelter. Lost, disoriented, confused—God is our guide. When the path grows too difficult, and you’re not sure how to proceed, seek refuge. God is your rescue.

Chad Senuta

next >

Pray

Lord, please be my refuge when the path grows dangerous. Give me shelter and safe passage through the storm. Help me to assist my fellow travelers on the way. Amen.

next >

Go

Oh, how sweet to walk in this pilgrim way,
Leaning on the everlasting arms;
Oh, how bright the path grows from day to day,
Leaning on the everlasting arms.

"Leaning on the Everlasting Arms" by Elisha A. Hoffman, 1887

Chad Senuta

Chad Senuta is a ragamuffin disciple and native Texan. He is married to the “most beautiful” priest in the Episcopal Church and has two daughters who are gorgeous and intelligent. He can’t remember which of them is which. He currently serves as the associate for youth and campus ministry for the Episcopal Diocese of Chicago.

Love Song

Clay Mottley

about d365