Pause

With the drawing of this Love and the voice of this Calling
We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.

T. S. Eliot, “Little Gidding” (1942)

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Listen

That’s why all the faithful should pray to you during troubled times, so that a great flood of water won’t reach them. You are my secret hideout! You protect me from trouble. You surround me with songs of rescue! Selah

Psalm 32:6-7

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Think

There’s just something about making mistakes that makes us want to hide. In the Garden of Eden, after Adam and Eve make their first big mistake, we learn that their second big mistake is... you guessed it, hiding.

The drive to hide can ultimately come from two sources: shame or safety. After all, there’s nothing wrong with seeking shelter in the midst of a hurricane! But what if our own lives are the hurricane we seek to flee? Ah, shame, you sinister thief!

The Psalmist knew the potential for shame embedded in life’s many mistakes. But rather than hide from God, the Psalmist found the courage and faith to hide in God. Rather than allowing the deceptive voices of shame to shout the Psalmist into the shadows, the Psalmist chose the saving security of God’s embrace, a shelter from a self-induced storm.

Dave McNeely

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Pray

God, save me from myself. When I am tempted to be ashamed and hide from you, hide me in the shelter of your comforting wings instead. Amen.

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Go

As you go, may your heart be forever anchored in the welcoming heart of God.

As you go, may you experience the joy of love rushing out to meet you on your path.

As you go, may the future paved by forgiveness lead you in the path of everlasting joy.

Dave McNeely

Dave McNeely currently serves as the Faith & Justice Scholars Coordinator and Adjunct Professor of Religion at Carson-Newman University in Jefferson City, TN, where he is a member of First Baptist Church. He is married to Mandy and has two children, Christopher and Noah.

I Surrender All

Mark Hayes

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